Editorial

January 17, 2019

Photographs originally commissioned by Club Church for the queer fetish techno party LockeRRoom. Photo: Remon Van de Kommer; Soulja Boy: Lotte Boon; Art Direction: Taka Taka
King John signing Magna Carta at Runnymeade 15 June 1215. – Illustration: Universal History Archive / Un / REX

Dear reader,

Have a look at this new piece by Taka Taka: 'The Leather-Feather Whip: Acting Up for the Virus’. Taka Taka identifies as a professional drag-thing who produces performances for the House of Hopelezz. In Amsterdam, he organizes weekly queer parties and para-educational strategies for the marginal LGBTQA community, including political and gender asylum seekers, friends with the virus, misfits and party monsters. 

We’ve just published ‘Who Steals the Goose from off the Common?‘, an interview by Louis Volont with historian Peter Linebaugh. Linebaugh, author of the The Magna Carta Manifesto: Liberties and Commons for All (2008) and Stop, Thief! The Commons, Enclosures, and Resistance, discusses the commons in a time wherein ‘the commoners of the world can no longer retire to the forests or run to the hills’, wherein common custom has become crime, and wherein the realm of commoning has transcended from the street to the state and from the peasant to the politician.

Also recently published is ‘Walking the Talk and Boating in Amsterdam. A Fabulous Meeting with Jack Halberstam’ by Charlotte Rooijackers. Halberstam is a queer theorist who's books include Wildness (2018) edited together with Tavia Nyong’o, The Queer Art of Failure (2011), and Gaga Feminism: Sex, Gender and the End of Normal (2012). The interview is about Halberstam's favorite subjects, including queer failure, bewilderment, popular film and animation, gender variances and queer artists.

Challenging Logistical AI. The Politics of Artificial Artificial Intelligence’ is an article by Krystian Woznicki, who wants to rethink political agency in an AI-driven world.

More recent contributions:

The Salt of the Earth. On Commonism’: an interview with philosopher Antonio Negri by Pascal Gielen and Sonja Lavaert. The interview is about the concepts launched by Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri in Assembly. According to them we must confront the problem of leadership and institutions, dare to imagine the entrepreneurship of the multitude, appropriate old terms and reverse their meaning. 

It’s So Nice That We Don’t Have to Talk about Politics Anymore’: an ongoing work by artist Saša Karalić. Presented here in the form of three videos, it shows a group of people performing a number of political slogans in public space. In each version of the work, the slogans are conceived, after extensive research, within the social context in which they are performed and based on the ‘general politics of truth’ of that context.

Other Voices, Other Views’: an academic research project led by Lauren Alexander, Maarten Cornel and Niels Schrader and executed by Graphic Design students from the Royal Academy of Art (KABK), with guest tutors Ramon Amaro, Femi Dawkins and Kelly Walters. The project, in the form of video interviews, invites students to closely examine their own racial, cultural and gender identities aiming to critically rethink how established norms have come into being. 

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Jorinde Seijdel